The Ivy League Goes Test-Optional…Almost

Following both Brown’s and Yale’s test-optional announcements, yesterday evening, June 15, Harvard became the seventh Ivy League college to suspend the requirement of SAT and ACT scores for Fall 2021 first year applicants.  Why is Princeton, as the last remaining Ivy League, still requiring standardized test scores for Fall 2021 first year applicants?

Since the Ivy League can be considered a bellwether for admissions practices, why are universities still maintaining testing requirements, when The College Board and ACT organizations may not proceed with administering the tests as normal this summer and fall depending on the pandemic? Additionally, a viable computerized, at-home SAT or ACT is not available at this time, and The College Board announced that an online version will not be available by Fall 2020 in time for the next application cycle. 

If students can’t take the SAT or ACT, or re-test to improve their scores, they may forgo the opportunity to apply or be competitive for admissions where test scores are still required, simply due to a pandemic beyond their control.  What are the possible long-term effects of less access to a range of college options, both for the university and the individual? 

About Jill Yoshikawa, Ed M, Partner of Creative Marbles Consultancy

Jill Yoshikawa, EdM, Harvard ’99, a seasoned, 25 year educator and consultant, is meticulous in helping clients navigate all aspects of the educational experience, no matter the level of complexity. She combines educational theory with experience to advise families, schools and educators. A UCSD and Harvard graduate, as well as a former high school teacher, Jill works tirelessly to help her clients succeed.
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